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Seminars, conferences and online resources on psychotherapy and human relationships
The Early Bonds of Mutual Love
1-day seminar with Dr Allan Schore

Saturday 9 November 2013

SOLD OUT

FULL PROGRAMME
09.30   Registration and coffee
10.00   

The interpersonal Neurobiology of Mutual Love - PART I
This lecture-dialogue will begin with Allan Schore presenting classical conceptions of mutual love by Darwin, Freud, Winnicott, Bowlby, Fromm, Stern, and Harlow. He will then frame an interpersonal neurobiological perspective of both low arousal "quiet" and high arousal "excited" mother-infant love, focusing on the role of right brain-to-right brain communications.
11.15   Coffee
11.45   

The interpersonal Neurobiology of Mutual Love - PART 2
This lecture will provide an overview of current neuroimaging research studies of parental, and specifically maternal love, which highlights the essential roles of the right amygdala, cingulate, and orbitofrontal cortex in both mother and infant. Schore will describe the initial emergence of mutual love at 2-3 months, utilizing the work of Stern, Fogel, and Trevarthen. A detailed analysis of developmental psychological studies of facial expressions the loving mother directs towards her infant in this critical period will be followed by an exposition of the neurobiological and neurophysiological mechanisms that underlie mother-infant mutual love.
13.00   Lunch
14.15   

The role of the amygdala in all forms of mutual love
In this session, Schore will elaborate the role of the right amygdala, an essential structural system that is activated in all later adult forms of mutual love. The co-creation of mother-infant mutual love, a bond of "deep affection, strong emotional attachment" represents the expression of an instinctual evolutionary mechanism that is continually activated over the stages of human development. Offering a neurobiological update of Freud's topographic theory he will suggest that the right amygdala, the "deep unconscious," is essential to all later forms of mutual love.
15.30   Tea
16.00   

Neurobiologically informed studies of adult romantic love with implications for psychotherapy
Presenting current neuroimaging studies of adult romantic love, Schore will suggest that subcortical limbic-autonomic areas of the right brain, especially the right amygdala, generate the most intense nonverbal embodied expressions of the human heart. In the last part of the day he will discuss the implications of this contribution of regulation theory for psychotherapy and the culture.
17.30   End
Fees

Self-funded: £150
Organisationally-funded: £225
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CPD Hours

Certificates of Attendance for 7 hours will be provided at the event
Venue

5th Floor Lecture Theatre
Tavistock Centre
120 Belsize Lane
London
NW3 5BA
DIRECTIONS & MAP >>
Schedule

Registration: 09.30
Start: 10.00
End: 17.30
BOOKING CONDITIONS >>
BOOK ONLINE >>