Being Present with Suffering

Being Present with Suffering

A one-day seminar led by Nigel Wellings and Elizabeth Wilde McCormick

Recorded Saturday 23 November 2019

There is something about everything that makes it not quite satisfactory. Even things we really love are spoilt by not being quite enough or – the opposite – going on too long. People entering psychotherapy want to feel better – more authoritative, less anxious or depressed, more whole – and although it can help, an enormous amount of difficult and painful emotions continue to arise. After years and years of therapy many of us feel as mad as ever. There is no ‘happy ever after’. This all begs the question; what is the place of suffering in human experience and how best can we be with it?

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FULL PROGRAMME

Liz McCormick
Suffering in Loss and Bereavement
This presentation will explore the value of different cultural and therapeutic approaches to bereavement with attention to ways in which this challenging human experience, common to us all, may be supported rather than over-medicalised or limited by unmanageable goals. Bereavement can become a rite of passage where life and death, darkness and light are experienced within the safe embrace of unconditional friendliness.

Nigel Wellings
Suffering, Buddhism and Psychotherapy
One of the more pervasive symptoms of our discontent is the experience of emptiness and yet the same word is used in Buddhism to describe its deepest and most transformative truth. Apparently polar opposites, could these two understandings of emptiness – psychotherapeutic and the Buddha’s Dharma – shed a deeper, more realistic light on the inevitability of suffering and how we best accommodate this?

FEES

Confer member:
£24
(Click here to become a member)

Self-funded:
£30

Test and Certificate of Attendance (available soon):
£20

CPD

A certificate of attendance may be applied for (2.5 hours CPD) on the basis of passing a multiple choice questionnaire. (Coming soon)

SCHEDULE

Liz McCormick
Suffering in Loss and Bereavement

Nigel Wellings
Suffering, Buddhism and Psychotherapy