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Live Events Programme

Summer 2017


Live Events



The New Paradigm in Neuroscience: How Do We Practice with People with Trauma?
Friday 19 and Saturday 20 May 2017
Dr Sharon Stanley

The last decade has challenged psychotherapists to integrate a massive amount of data and information into their practice with highly vulnerable patients. How do we decide what is essential to adapt to our practice and with specific patients? Sharon Stanley will outline the major shifts in terms of relational principles governing psychotherapy today and describe six essential practices that emerge from the paradigm shift.

Working with Splitting and Projecting: Therapeutic Skills and Insights
Saturday 10 June 2017
Dr Maggie Turp, Dr Noreen Giffney, Marianne Rourke

The aim of this day is to discuss how trauma can lead to the defense mechanism of splitting and projecting, and to examine why some people may be more reliant on this psychological strategy than others. We will consider how the propensity for splitting-off unwanted parts of the self or other, and displacing these, can be psychotherapeutically resolved, and ask what therapeutic interventions support the capacity to know and integrate all aspects of the self.

A Guide to the 12 Step Fellowships for Psychotherapists
Saturday 17 June 2017
Anna Santamouris, Maya Jacobs-Wallfisch, Malcolm Peterson, Prof Gabriel Segal

Many people coming to psychotherapy also attend a 12-Step Fellowships as a means of addressing a pattern of addiction or having been raised in a family where addiction is a problem. Therapists need to be aware of the processes involved in these meetings in order to support their client's recovery process. What conflicts might the 12 Steps and 12 Traditions have with psychotherapy, and how are these best navigated in order to allow parallel pathways in the client’s personal development to flourish?

Providing Psychotherapy in a Digital Era – the relational and neurobiological implications
Saturday 24 June 2017
Linda Cundy, Dr Gillian Isaacs Russell, Catherine Knibbs

We live in a rapidly changing technical environment that offers new many new ways communicating with others. While virtual relationships become increasingly normal, this is quickly impacting on the practice of psychotherapy: online sessions are a growing trend that will enable many people – especially those who are geographically isolated, unwell or short of time – to have the therapy they couldn’t otherwise access. But what are the emotional, neurobiological and interpersonal implications of this new kind of intimacy? Are we evolving a new genre of therapy, across theoretical fields, that has different parameters, boundaries, possibilities or constraints? We will unpack the issues.

Gut-Heart-Brain: Where is our emotional centre, and what is the relevance to psychotherapy?
Saturday 1 July 2017
Michael Ash, Dr Janina Fisher, Dr Art O'Malley and Dr Alan Watkins

It is now accepted that the brain is not the only emotional processing system of the human mind-body, and that other parts of the body play a significant role in affect regulation. At this conference we will weave science with therapeutic insight to explore the part of the gut and the heart in the highly complex pathway of communication between the structures of the body and the mind. The day will consider how far this knowledge contributes to appropriate therapeutic approaches to working with people suffering from the residues of trauma, affect dysregulation or mood disorders.

Energy Therapies: How Do They Really Work?
Saturday 8 July 2017
Dr Phil Mollon, Ruthie Smith

Energy Psychotherapy, and the ever increasing related modalities, is creating a vibrant and expansive new field of work, with remarkable, transformative results. Using relatively simple techniques alongside talking therapy, psychotherapy with people’s energy systems – their meridians and energy centres - helps us access a deeper and wider clinical terrain, that reaches the parts that talking therapy alone cannot address. We will look at the methods of energy therapies, and formulate some explanations for its effect.

The Landscapes of Grief
Saturday 15 July 2017
John Banville, Ann Chalmers, Dr Avril Meddrell, Adam Phillips, Julia Samuel

It is a universal truth is that we are all going to die. We know this but we tend to ignore the reality, and to struggle with the inevitability that we will lose people we love. Death is ‘unacceptable’ and 15 percent of all psychological disorders in our society are due to unresolved grief. But within the last two decades there has been a revolution of understandings and theories that help us understand the process of healthy mourning. This day brings together therapy, landscape and literature to look at theories and processes that facilitate healthy grieving – both in psychotherapeutic practice and in life itself.

Working Psychotherapeutically with Obesity
Saturday 22 July 2017
Dr Julia Buckroyd, Em Farrell

In this workshop we will think about the role of fat in our society and of the individual’s sense of bodily self in relationship to others. We will consider how we can apply the general insights of therapeutic work with eating disorders to the specific problem of obesity, some common issues around gaining emotional nourishment, myths concerning over-weight, and how to work therapeutically when this is a source of distress. In addition, we will explore how the body of the therapist and patient relate to each other when weight is an issue.








Book of the Month
Grief Works by Julia Samuel

Death affects us all. Yet it is still the last taboo in our society, and grief is still profoundly misunderstood...

In Grief Works we hear stories from those who have experienced great love and great loss - and survived. Stories that explain how grief unmasks our greatest fears, strips away our layers of protection and reveals our innermost selves...
More >>
Watch this
Helen Fisher: The brain in love

Why do we crave love so much, even to the point that we would die for it? To learn more about our very real, very physical need for romantic love, Helen Fisher and her research team took MRIs of people in love — and people who had just been dumped... view...

Did you know?
The Latest Neuroimaging Findings in Borderline Personality Disorder

Altered function in neurotransmitter systems including the serotonin, glutamate, and GABA systems was observed in patients with BPD... read more...